Cary Cherniss, Ph.D.

member emotional intelligence consortium

Affiliation: Rutgers University, Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Email: cherniss@rci.rutgers.edu

View Cary's profile on LinkedIn


Biography

Cary Cherniss received his Ph.D. in Psychology from Yale University in 1972. He went on to teach at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, the University of Illinois in Chicago, the Chicago Medical School, and the Illinois Institute of Technology. In 1983, he came to Rutgers University where he helped create the doctoral program in Organizational Psychology at the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology. He currently is Professor of Applied Psychology.

Cary specializes in the areas of emotional intelligence, work stress, leadership development, and planned organizational change. He has published over 60 scholarly articles and book chapters on these topics, as well as seven books. In addition to his research and writing, Cary has consulted with many organizations in both the public and private sectors, including American Express, Johnson & Johnson, the U.S. Coast Guard, AT&T, Telcordia, Colgate Palmolive, the United States Office of Personnel Management, the Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Honeywell, PSEG Power, and the Marriott Corporation. He currently is the director and co-chair (with Daniel Goleman) of the Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organizations. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and past president of its Division 27 (Society for Community Research and Action), and a member of the Academy of Management and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP).

Articles

Cherniss, C. (2010). Emotional intelligence: New insights and further clarifications. Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 3, 183-191.

Cherniss, C. (2010). Emotional intelligence: Towards clarification of a concept. Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 3, 110-126.

Cherniss, C., Grimm, L., & Liautaud, J. P. (2010). Process-designed training: A new approach for helping leaders develop emotional and social competence. Journal of Management Development, 29, 413-431.

Cherniss, C., Extein, M., Goleman, D., & Weissberg, R. P. (2006). Emotional intelligence: What does the research really indicate? Educational Psychologist, 41, 239-245.

Cherniss, C., & Caplan, R. D. (2001). A case study in implementing emotional intelligence programs in organizations. Journal of Organizational Excellence, 21 (1), 73-85.

Cherniss, C. (1998, April). Social and emotional learning for leaders. Educational Leadership, 26-28.

Cherniss, C. (1991). Career commitment in human service professionals: A biographical study. Human Relations, 44, 419-437.

Cherniss, C. (1991). Long-term consequences of burnout: An exploratory study. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 12, 1-11.

Cherniss, C. (1990). Recovery from burnout: Results of a 10 year follow-up study. Journal of Health and Human Resources Administration, 13, 132-154.

Cherniss, C. (1989). Burnout in new professionals: A long-term follow-up study. Journal of Health and Human Resources Administration, 12, 11-24.

Cherniss, C. (1998, April). Social and emotional learning for leaders. Educational Leadership, 26-28.

Book Chapters

Cherniss, C. (2010). Helping leaders to become emotionally intelligent. In Bunker, K., Hall, D. T., & Kram, K. (Eds.), Extraordinary leadership: Addressing the gaps in senior executive development (pp. 97-120). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Cherniss, C. (2010). Emotional intelligence. In I. B. Weiner & W. E. Craighead (Eds.), Corsini’s encyclopedia of psychology, fourth edition. NY: John Wiley & Sons.

Cherniss, C. (2007). The role of emotional intelligence in the mentoring process. In B. R. Ragins & K. E. Kram (Eds.), The handbook of mentoring. (pp. 427-446). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Cherniss, C. (2006). Leadership and emotional intelligence. In R. J. Burke & C. L. Cooper (Eds.), Inspiring leaders (pp. 132-148). London: Routledge.

Cherniss, C., & Goleman, D. (2006). From school to work: Social and emotional learning as the vital connection. In M. J. Elias & H. Arnold (Eds.) The educator's guide to emotional intelligence and academic achievement (pp. 58-61). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Cherniss, C. (2004). Intelligence, emotional. In C. Spielberger (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Applied Psychology (Vol. 2, pp. 315-321). Oxford, UK: Elsevier.

Cherniss, C. (2001). Emotional intelligence and organizational effectiveness. In C. Cherniss & D. Goleman (Eds.), The emotionally intelligent workplace. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Cherniss, C., & Goleman, D. (2001). Training for emotional intelligence: A model. In C. Cherniss & D. Goleman (Eds.), The emotionally intelligent workplace. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Cherniss, C., & Caplan, R. (2001). Implementing emotional intelligence programs in organizations: The American Express Financial Advisors case. In C. Cherniss & D. Goleman (Eds.), The emotionally intelligent workplace. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Cherniss, C., & Deegan, G. (2000). The creation of alternative settings. In J. Rappaport & E. Seidman (Eds.), Handbook of community psychology (pp. 359-378). New York: Plenum.

Cherniss, C. (1986). Different ways of thinking about burnout. In E. Seidman & J. Rappaport (Eds.), Redefining social problems. New York: Plenum, 217-229.

Cherniss, C. (1980). Human service programs as work organizations: Using organizational design to improve staff motivation and effectiveness. In R. H. Price & P. E. Politser (Eds.), Evaluation and action in the social environment. New York: Academic Press, 125-153.

Additional Books

Fishman, D.B., & Cherniss, C. (1990). The human side of corporate competitiveness. Newbury Park: Sage.

Cherniss, C. (1980). Staff burnout: Job stress in the human services. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.

Cherniss, C. (1980). Professional burnout in human service organizations. New York: Praeger.

 

 

 

EI Consortium Copyright Policy

Any written material on this web site can be copied and used in other sources as long as the user acknowledges the author of the material (if indicated on the web site) and indicates that the source of the material was the web site for the Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organizations (www.eiconsortium.org).